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Five-State Government Documents Conference
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FDLP Icon Five-State Government Documents Conference 2006 FDLP Icon
Program Abstracts

 

These are the abstracts and presenter bios for each presentation. For more information on when presentations are taking place, please see the schedule.

Click on these titles to view the abstracts:

The 75th Anniversary of the New Deal Art Projects: Celebrate Community Culture
    While we who work closely with government documents know better, government material is too often accused by the uninitiated of being dense and dreary stuff! In 2008 the United States will be celebrating the 75th anniversary of the introduction of the New Deal Art Projects. These projects supplied many artists in the Western states the opportunity to ply their craft and leave behind a legacy of artwork that communities still benefit from today. The anniversary is a fun opportunity to move beyond the reputation that government documents have, and illustrate some unusual ways government funding has been used to enrich our culture. Our presentation will:
1) Introduce the New Deal arts projects, how they came about, and what their significance was to the country; present a photo journey through some of the major collection of New Deal art in the western region – drawing attention to the different types of art included in the projects;
2) Explore creating an exhibit or display based on local resources, various federal agency web sites, internet web sites, government publications and other published materials, as well as experts that could be drawn upon to create 2008 New Deal art project exhibits.
3) Describe the unique exhibit planned for New Mexico and the progress made toward its implementation.
Presenters:
Kirsten J. Clark, Reference & Research Services Department, New Mexico State University Library
Mardi A. Mahaffy, Reference & Research Services Department, New Mexico State University Library
Sylvia P. Ortiz, Reference & Research Services Department, New Mexico State University Library

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Blogging on Documents
     At this point most of us have heard about blogs and we may have even heard about those things people call RSS feeds, but what do they have to do with government documents? This presentation will talk about what a blog is (and why libraries care), who is creating blogs, coming up with material, and much more. Then to prove that creating a blog is possible, even for the most technically inept among us, participants will have the opportunity to create their own blogs.
Presenter:
Jennie Gerke is an Electronic Government Information Librarian at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She has been working there for the past two years and created and maintains their blog.

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Boulder County – Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
     So how does Boulder County compare to Denver County? Or Santa Fe County, NM? Or Laramie County WY, Pima County AZ, and Cache County UT?
USA Counties IN Profile can help!! The site aggregates socio-economic, demographic, employment, and industry data from the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, and Bureau of Economic Analysis. Users can get profiles of and compare up to four counties at a time and look at ranking tables for 3,141 U.S. counties.

How does Colorado compare to New Mexico? What about Utah, Arizona, and Wyoming
USA States IN Profile aggregates a broader range of information, adding in data from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Office of Trade and Economic Analysis, National Center for Education Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, and more.
This workshop will introduce users to these two tools developed and maintained by Indiana University 's Indiana Business Research Center , a partner in the Census Bureau's State Data Center Program. The tools allow users anywhere to gather and compare data on any of the 50 states and/or 3,141 counties.
Presenter:
After four years with the Peace Corps in Nepal and the Central African Republic, Frank Wilmot began his library career at The New York Public Library’s Bronx Reference Center while pursuing his MLS at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. After stints at the University of Virginia’s Darden Business School and the Indiana State Library, he joined the Government Publications Library at CU Boulder in July 2006.

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Cataloging Focus Group
     There are many cataloging challenges in federal documents management. This discussion group will consider any cataloging topics of interest to the group. Possible topics may include managing Marcive shipping list and full records, sources of cataloging copy, management of URLs, display and indexing of SuDocs numbers, fixed field issues, how to catalog the Serial Set. Let's get together, compare notes, and help each other out.
Presenters:
Government Documents Librarians from the 5-state region

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Use Statistics for E-docs: Depository Library PURL Referrals
     In the predominately electronic FDLP, traditional statistics that measure collection use such as circulation are decreasing. Depositories need to find other use statistics that can demonstrate the use of depository publications. GPO’s Depository Library PURL Referrals can provide meaningful statistics with a little work.
Presenter:
Tim Byrne is the Head of the Government Publications Library at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has held numerous positions within ALA GODORT. He was recently appointed to the Depository Library Council.

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Developing Government Information Expertise or a Plan of Attack for Instruction in a Small Academic Library
     Academic librarians strive to help students to think critically and question “conventional wisdom.” Teaching about government information is an essential part in shaping a learner as a reflective and well-informed citizen. However, a typical library instruction session does not include government documents. With the explosion of government information on the Internet and availability of teaching guides and tutorials one would think that it has become easier for librarians to integrate government information sources into their teaching practices. Nevertheless, several barriers, described by Judith Downie, such as lack of faculty support, complexity of government information, and brevity of instruction time, contribute to the low usage of government documents and the exclusion of government information from library instruction sessions.
     The current context of integrated collections, merged departments, and blurred job responsibilities calls for creating a built-in approach for integrating government information into library instruction. This requires a gradual introduction of government documents along with the increase of depth and multiplicity on succeeding academic levels. Such approach is beneficial for faculty, students, and librarians. Integrated library instruction with government information takes the mystery and confusion out of government information and responds to immediate students' research needs. It lays out a wide and deep framework for students' research, which, in turn, will result in more complete and complex works on their part. It also allows sharing and increasing professional expertise among librarians. It creates collaborative relationships between faculty and librarians to encourage students to make critical and well-informed choices.
     This session will propose practical solutions and guidelines for a seamless library instruction program starting with freshmen classes, raising the complexity bar with junior and senior classes, and finishing with research classes. The session also aims at bringing librarians together to share their best teaching practices about government information integration into library instruction.
Presenter:
Tatiana Pashkova-Balkenhol is Business Reference and Government Information Coordinator at Emporia State University Library in Emporia, Kansas. She has experience in teaching, legal and general reference. She has a Bachelor's in English from a Russian University and a dual Master's in English and Library Science from Emporia State University.

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E-metrics for E-docs: Getting a Handle on Virtual Circulation of Federal Documents
     Although the GPO provides rudimentary statistics for PURLs accessed through depository Web servers and OPACS (if registered), these statistics are partial and unsatisfactory. For three years the University of Denver has been collecting and tabulating statistics of click-throughs to online federal documents when accessed through the local OPAC or through the regional Prospector union catalog. This presentation will discuss the technology used, the interesting results over a three-year period, and implications for managing an electronic depository.
Presenter:
Chris Brown is Reference Services Coordinator at the University of Denver, Penrose Library, a 70% selective depository. He has been the Government Documents Librarian for 8 years.

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The Erie Triangle: Back to the Future
     This will be a presentation of the mechanics of the acquisition in the 1790s by Pennsylvania of the current northwest corner of the state. It will be a discussion of boundary negotiations between New York and Pennsylvania; of treaties between the tribes holding the Triangle lands and both the federal and Pennsylvania governments; and of various points relating to later Indian treaty activities west of the Mississippi.
Presenter:
Charles D. Bernholz is the Government Documents Librarian at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. His research interests focus upon treaties created by the Indian Nations and the governments of North America, and upon the development of federal Indian law in the United States and in Canada.

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The Foreign Relations of the United States Series and the Declassification of State Department Documents
     Dr. Schulzinger will speak on issues surrounding the publication of the Foreign Relations of the United States series and the declassification of State Department documents. From 1969 through 2005, Dr Schulzinger served on the U.S. State Department's Advisory Committee on Historical Diplomatic Documentations. The Advisory Committee reviews records, advises, and makes recommendations to the Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs, concerning the Foreign Relations of the United States documentary series.  The Committee also reviews the declassification procedures of the Department of State.
Presenter:
Dr. Schulzinger is Professor of History and director of the International Affairs Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is the editor-in-chief for the journal Diplomatic History.

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Genealogical Resources for Academic Research
     Genealogists have been major users of the Internet and provide a great deal of information that can be used for scholarly research. See some of what's available and how valuable it can be.
Presenter:
Sharon Partridge has worked in public libraries for over 35 years and has spent almost 20 of them as a documents librarian.

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Keynote Address by Superintendent of Documents
     Judy Russell will talk about current issues at the Government Printing Office and in the Federal Depository Library Program.
Presenter:
Judy Russell, Managing Director, Information Dissemination, (Superintendent of Documents)
Time:
Thursday, August 3, 9-10am

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Historical Data on the Hispanic Population in the U.S. Census – A Case Study
     How would you research the growth of the U.S. Hispanic population over the past century? Good question…
In 1930, the Census Bureau counted "Mexicans" and in 1940, "persons of Spanish mother tongue" were reported. In 1950 and 1960, "persons of Spanish surname" were counted in five southwestern states, including Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. In 1970, the Census asked about a person's "origin" and one could choose from among several Hispanic origins listed. In 1980, persons of "Spanish origin" reported as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or "other Hispanic." The 1990 Census published data on about 20 “Hispanic origin” groups. Most recently, the 2000 Census tabulated data on the “Hispanic or Latino” population, subdivided into about 25 groups.
Using Colorado as a case study, this presentation will discuss the Census Bureau’s efforts over time to collect statistics on people who trace their origins or descent to Spain or to Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and many other Spanish-speaking countries of Central and South America, as well as issues and concerns about using the data to analyze trends.
Presenter:
After four years with the Peace Corps in Nepal and the Central African Republic, Frank Wilmot began his library career at The New York Public Library’s Bronx Reference Center while pursuing his MLS at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. After stints at the University of Virginia’s Darden Business School and the Indiana State Library, he joined the Government Publications Library at CU Boulder in July 2006.

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John C. Fremont's Travels in Colorado and Wyoming as Documented in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set
     Fremont led three expeditions across the Rocky mountains during the 1840s, each of which is detailed in a report included in the Congressional Serial Set. In widely distributed official editions and numerous commercial reprints these reports did much to stimulate and guide Western migration. This talk will focus on Fremont's routes across Wyoming and Colorado and his descriptions of what he saw.
Presenter:
Steven F. Daniel is currently Senior Serial Set Consultant to the Readex Digital Serial Set Project. Having previously worked at Congressional Information Service, Inc. for 30 years, he has been involved with Congressional Serial Set, historical and modern, virtually his entire professional life.

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The Kansas-Nebraska Model: Redefining a Regional FDLP Collection
     Public access to U.S. Federal Government Information is a long held value in American society. This value has long been realized through the sharing of government documents through the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) and its partner libraries throughout the country. One aspect of that partnership has been 'Regional Collections' that are required to keep and maintain one copy of every tangible publication distributed, as a long-term archival resource to the public. Three FDLP partners, all academic libraries in Kansas and Nebraska, are developing and embarking on a plan to re-define 'Regional Collection' responsibilities for the FDLP system in the two states. Rather than have the two Regional Libraries (University of Kansas and University of Nebraska-Lincoln) continue to build parallel Regional Collections, these two, plus a third partner, Kansas State University, will collaborate and share the load for establishing and maintaining the 'Regional Collection' in trust and service to the public.
     This presentation will discuss the rationale, planning, process, and devising of the partnership, challenges that rose up in the process, and how the partnership is to be implemented.
Presenters:
Debbie Madsen is Head of Government Publications at the Kansas State University
Charles D. Bernholz is Government Documents Librarian at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Jeff Bullington is Government Information Librarian at the University of Kansas

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Keeping up without overloading (on U.S. Government Information)
     To date, living through the changes of the information age’s impact on libraries and watching GPO and the FDLP deal with new technologies and infinite amounts of information, resources and knowledge has been challenging. There seems to be no letting up of the increasing amounts of information generated by our federal government agencies and departments. More is available and more difficult to find. Demand for information is growing. How does one keep up with all that’s going on?
     I'd like to outline some tips and tricks to managing the flow of data coming at us everyday and discuss with the audience how to integrate that information to aid our patrons in finding the information they seek. The overarching aim of this program would be to provide some background in which to frame concerns of information overload and keeping up with developments to stimulate discuss, provide an opportunity to network with colleagues, and share individual suggestions and remedies.
Presenter:
McKinley Sielaff (BA, MLS, MPA) is librarian at the Tutt Library for the Colorado College. McKinley has built her career around US Government information from filing transmittals as a student worker at Rugters University to being the first Electronic Government Resources Librarian at the University of Wyoming to heading the FDPL programs at the University of Richmond and currently at the Colorado College.

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Managing a Tangible Collection in the Electronic Age: Collection Management Focus Group
     Discussion group on cataloging and weeding practices in the era of 90% of new material published online.
Presenters:
Government Documents Librarians from the 5-state region, including
Lisa Nickum, Government Publications Librarian, Colorado School of Mines;
Marit Taylor, Cataloging, Government Publications, and Reference Librarian, Auraria Library;
Louise Treff-Gangler, Head, Reference, Instruction & Government Publications, Auraria Library

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Many Nations: The Tribal and Federal Documents of American Indian Tribes
     Each American Indian tribe is a self-governing entity, producing internal government documents which have traditionally been extremely difficult to locate or research. At the same time, each tribe is subject to various United States laws which are recorded in more familiar federal documents sources. This program will explain the governmental status of tribes and the two distinct lines of tribal documentary history. Emerging efforts to make the documentary record of tribal nations more accessible will be identified.
Presenters:
Nancy Carol Carter, Legal Research Center Director and Professor of law at the University of San Diego, has written and spoken extensively on the bibliography of American Indian law. She is currently working under and American Association of Law Libraries grant to construct a web site to collect online archives of federal documents for individual tribes.
David Selden, Director of the National Indian Law Library of the native American Rights Fund, manages the nation’s most specialized collection of tribal documents and Native American legal resources. He leads an innovative tribal law digitization project and has been a frequent speaker on American Indian law information access. He co-authored a forthcoming article for Law Library Journal on his library’s newly developed subject thesaurus of Indian law terms.

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The Mysterious World of US Government Maps: An Introduction to Paper and Digital maps in the FDLP
     Maps are used for everything from general geography to genealogy to geology to flood plains. The usefulness and extent of maps created by the US federal government remains a mystery for most library patrons and many librarians. This talk will illuminate many of the map treasures made and distributed by the US government. Various map products available in both paper format and on the web will be presented, as well as an explanation of the advantages and drawbacks of each format. The type of maps discussed will include topographic, geologic, and base maps from such agencies as the USGS, US Forest Service, CIA, and DOT. This presentation will explore and give demonstrations of various map-related web sites including the National Map, GNIS, Library of Congress’ American Memory Project, National Geologic Mapping Database (NGMDB), National Interagency Fire Center, and FEMA. Additionally, some non-government sites will be examined including the David Rumsey Map Collection, the University of Texas, Austin: Perry-Castańeda Library Map Collection, and Aerial Photographs of Colorado.
Presenters:
Christopher J.J. Thiry has been the Map Librarian the Colorado School of Mines for 11 years. He is editor of the recently released Guide to U.S. Map Resources, 3rd edition.
Katie Lage has been the Map Librarian at University of Colorado at Boulder for 3 years. Her upcoming article on cataloging electronic cartographic materials for library catalogs will be published in the Journal of Map and Geography Libraries.

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National Park Service Denver Service Center
     This talk will be about the NPS Technical Information Center (TIC) at the Denver Service Center. TIC is the oldest centralized bibliographic information system for the National Park Service. TIC serves as the central repository for all NPS generated planning, design, and construction drawings, as well as technical reports. Our system has evolved from microfilming architectural and technical drawings in the 1960s to our current intranet accessible bibliographic database with retrievable images of each drawing or report.
Presenter:
Carol R. Simpson, Technical Information Center, NPS Denver Service Center

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Navajo History in Government Documents
     During the summer I will be digitizing a number of documents related to Navajo history, culture and relations with the U.S. Government for use by partisans in a history teaching workshop, sponsored by the UNC Department of History. These documents include reports of the various military expeditions into Navajo territory, especially the one during the war with Mexico, documents from the U.S. Geological survey, the Bureau of Ethnology, certain Census reports, and documents related to the 1868 treaty. In my presentation I would discuss the historical contexts, government programs, etc that produced these documents and how the events described were viewed and remembered in Navajo traditional sources.
Presenter:
Mark Anderson, Government Documents Librarian at UNC since 1994.

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New Mexico News Plus: Anticipatory Reference, Instruction, and Collection Development Tool
     This presentation will examine the concept, development and effectiveness of New Mexico News Plus as a proactive reference and collection development tool. New Mexico News Plus is a web-based information research service designed to serve as an access tool for New Mexico's libraries, students, teachers, citizen activists, and federal/state government policy makers. Updated each morning in response to the news of the day, New Mexico News Plus provides the user with links to government documents and agency contacts behind each story. With a dual focus on local newspapers from the north-central as well as the southern portion of the state, the site is intentionally designed to respond to the specific information interests of our state and local communities while still including pressing national issues and concerns. The program will also explain how New Plus contributes to the New Mexico State Library Digital Archive Project which provides a mechanism for the library to capture “fugitive” electronic documents from regional federal agencies that have been identified on New Mexico News Plus or through local agency contacts. Another web based initiative that is similar in concept but quite different in approach, Government Information for Montana will also be discussed as an alternative model.
Presenter:
Kirsten Clark has been Government Documents Librarian at New Mexico State University since 2004. Before that she was Documents Librarian at St. John's University (Minnesota) for seven years.
Tim Skeers, New Mexico State Library - Government Documents Cataloger. Tim has worked as both a reference librarian and cataloger in four federal depository libraries including the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Northern Illinois University, University of Nevada Las Vegas, and the New Mexico State Library from 1985 to present.
Laurie Canepa, New Mexico State Library. Laurie has worked as a reference librarian, law librarian, technical assistant, and regional librarian in federal depository libraries starting in 1980. First, in reference/technical processing in the Government Document Division at the University of Utah, subsequently as a reference librarian at the Lewis & Clark Law School, and finally in her current position as reference and regional librarian at the New Mexico State Library where she has worked since 1990.

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Nixon v. History: A Posthumous Victory?
     After President Richard M. Nixon resigned from office under threat of impeachment, he signed an agreement with the government that gave him control over his presidential tapes and records, including the right to destroy his furtive tape recordings that led to his fall from grace. Although Nixon was acting in the tradition of presidents before him in claiming ownership of his presidential records, an alarmed Congress passed emergency legislation in December 1974 to confiscate the former president’s White House materials for the continuing Watergate trials and investigations and to make them publicly accessible at the “earliest reasonable date.” The 1974 law also mandated that they be kept in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. For the next 30 years, Nixon and his estate waged an extraordinary campaign to shut down access to and reassert control over his presidential tapes and records as a centerpiece of the former president’s efforts to rehabilitate his image as an elder statesman. In the end, Nixon’s estate appears to have won the war when in 1994 Congress agreed to transfer Nixon’s presidential materials to the privately run Nixon Library in Yorba Linda, California. Under the plan, the Nixon Library would then become part of the presidential libraries system, ending its long self-imposed exile, and placing the materials under the influence of Nixon’s family member and loyalists. The question, however, is whether the access wars to Nixon’s tapes and records will continue as some historians and journalists fear.
Presenter:
Bruce P. Montgomery, Faculty Director of Archives, University of Colorado at Boulder

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Open Forum
     Open discussion of issues relating to government information relevant to the five-state region led by Regional Librarians. Topics will include sharing the Regional collection between several states and the University of Colorado's IMLS grant, "Government Information in the 21st Century" which will train librarians in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming to use government information.
Presenters:
Regional Librarians

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Reference Focus Group
     There are many reference challenges when working with federal documents. Patrons of all ages need information at varying levels. There is the exciting challenge many of us face of dealing with a largely uncataloged collection. There is the problem of remembering and figuring out which web site to go to for current information. We are often the person that get those fun, impossible questions that no one else wants. So let's to get together and talk about strategies for discovering those hidden treasures and share some of our favorite war stories.
Presenters:
Government Documents Librarians from the 5-state region

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U.S. Government Information: Los Fugitivos
     The presenters have been selecting Spanish-language government publications for a variety of projects. They have discovered what they consider to be a large number of titles in electronic formats that appear not to have been distributed through the Federal Depository Library Program in any format, and in many cases to have no record at all in OCLC. They describe their methods of identifying appropriate documents, the cataloging of these items, their work with the New Mexico State Library in harvesting these items into the OCLC Digital Archive, and promoting the use of these items under the Community Center tab of WebJunction New Mexico.
Presenters:
Jim Veatch (BA, MA, MLS, Ph.D.) is Senior Librarian for Technical Services at the Thomas Branigan Memorial Library in Las Cruces, NM, and Justine Veatch (BA, MA) is a Library Consultant.

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Use of Government Information in Undergraduate Research
     Examines government information in 150+ bibliographies compiled by college undergraduate college students enrolled in an entirely online one-credit information literacy course. In a previously published paper*, I discussed using the structure of a reference interview to effectively teach independent research in an entirely online setting. This teaching model presents the library as part of a larger information system and emphasizes evaluation skills. Students select their own research topics and are assigned to produce an annotated bibliography that includes 1 reference tool, 1 book, 2 articles and 2 web sites. Interestingly, even though students are not specifically required to use government information nearly half of student bibliographies do include government sources. Most government sources were found online by using standard search engines such as Google or Yahoo or by searching a specific .gov site. Compares data to other studies through a literature review of undergraduate citation studies. Implications for documents, reference and instruction librarians are discussed.
*Integrating Library Reference Services in an Online Information Literacy Course: The Internet Navigator as a Model. By: Brunvand, Amy. Internet Reference Services Quarterly, 2004, Vol. 9 Issue 3/4, p159-178
Presenter:
Amy Brunvand is a government documents librarian at the University of Utah Marriott Library. Working as part of the Utah Academic Library Consortium Information for Life Taskforce, she helped develop the "Internet Navigator", an open-source information literacy textbook.

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The World of Business Statistics
     Statistics are a crucial part of business reference. As reference service providers, we face constant requests for numbers to backup research for businesses, researchers or students. We will share with you our favorite government sources for business statistics.
Presenters:
Leticia Camacho is the Business Librarian for Harold B. Lee Library. She graduated from University of Texas at Austin, nine years ago, and has worked for libraries for 16 years in several library positions.

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