UCB Libraries

 

How Do I... search for Cited References?

 

  • Overview
  • Cited Reference Searching
  • Journal Impact
  • Additional Tools

 

Searching for cited references (also called "citation tracking" or "citation chaining") can be useful when conducting research for the following reasons:

 

  • To find other works (articles, books, etc.) that have cited an important and/or highly relevant work on your research topic

  • To find other researchers with similar research interests

  • To assess the "importance" of a particular work by finding out how many other authors/works have cited a particular work

  • To follow the development of an idea, or the scholarly conversation on a topic, over time

Note: Within this guide, the term "work" is used to refer to scholarly publication, be it an article, book, book chapter, dissertation, white paper, etc.

 

Updated 10/17/11 SA

 

There are many different resources that allow you to search for cited references. Below is a list of some of the sources available from the CU Libraries. Click on the names to get more information, instructions and tips for searching for cited references in each of these sources:

 

  • Web of Science
  • Google Scholar
  • EBSCO
  • Proquest
  • MathSciNet

Coverage: The Web of Science contains citations from high impact journals within the broad fields of Science (1900-present), Social Sciences (1900-present) and Arts and Humanities (1975-present).

 

What you can do: You can conduct a "Cited Reference Search" to search for both the number and citation details of the works that cited the original work. To complete a cited reference search, you need to:

 

  • Enter the author's name
    • Tip: Search both last name, initial and last name, first name - like Wieman, C* OR Wieman, Carl
  • Enter the name of the journal/publication (not the article title)
    • Tip: Use the journal abbreviation look up to use to search the title - like Brit Med J OR BMJ (for British Medical Journal)
  • Enter the year of publication (ex: 2001)

 

You'll then see a list of articles that matched your search. Select the article you're interested in by placing a checkmark in the box to the left of the chosen article, then click the "Finish Search" button. You'll then see a list of all of the citing articles, and you'll have the ability to refine/narrow the list with the options presented on the left side of the screen.

 

You can also try ResearcherID, which is a website where invited researchers can register for a unique researcher ID number. At this site, users can update their profile information, build their publication list using Web of Science and Web of Knowledge search services or uploading a file, and select to make their profile public or private. Registered as well as non-registered users can search the ResearcherID Registry to view profiles and find potential collaborators.

 

Have additional questions about using the Web of Science for cited reference searching? View the Web of Science Cited Reference Searching tutorial (6:54) or ask a CU librarian any questions you may have.

Coverage: Google Scholar includes information about "articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites." More information available from About Google Scholar.

 

What you can do: Many search results in Google Scholar will display a "Cited by #" link underneath each result

 

  • Search for the specific work or author you're looking for
  • Clicking on the "Cited by #" link displayed underneath many items listed in the search results will bring you to the list of works that cited the original work.
  • Additionally, you can used the Advanced Scholar Search to search for specific works by authors, publications, and date ranges. Advanced Scholar Search will also allow you to limit your results by subject area, rather than everything Google Scholar contains.
  • Google Scholar Citations also provides a simple way for authors to keep track of citations to their articles. You can check who is citing your publications, graph citations over time, and compute several citation metrics. You can also make your profile public, so that it may appear in Google Scholar results when people search for your name.

Have additional questions about using Google Scholar for cited reference searching? Ask a CU librarian any questions you may have.

Coverage: Many (but not all) of the EBSCO research databases have linked cited references available in the search results. (Examples: Academic Search Premier, Business Source Complete, plus others.)

 

What you can do: Some search results in some of the EBSCO research databases will display a "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link underneath individual search results

  • Search by author, title, publication title, publication year, etc.
  • Find the work you were searching for in search results
  • Look for the "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link
  • Clicking on the "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link will bring you to the list of other works that cited the original work

Because not all individual works/publications contained in the EBSCO research databases have this feature available, this may not be the most comprehensive approach for determining total citations to a particular work.

 

Have additional questions about using the EBSCO research databases for cited reference searching? Ask a CU librarian any questions you may have.

Coverage: Many (but not all) of the Proquest research databases have cited reference linking available in the search results. (Examples: PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, others - see the full list from Proquest)

 

What you can do: Some search results in some of the Proquest research databases will display a "Cited by (#)" link underneath individual citations in the search results

  • Search by author, title, publication title, publication year, etc.
  • Find the work you were searching for in search results
  • Look for the "Cited by (#)" link
  • Clicking on the "Cited by (#)" link will bring you to the list of other works that cited the original work

Because not all individual works/publications contained in the Proquest research databases have this feature available, this may not be the most comprehensive approach for determining total citations to a particular work.

 

Have additional questions about using the Proquest research databases for cited reference searching? Ask a CU librarian any questions you may have.

Coverage: MathSciNet, produced by the American Mathmatical Society, contains citations to mathematical research literature and reviews.

 

What you can do: In MathSciNet, click on the "Citations" tab on the main page, where you can:

  • Get citation totals for individual authors (by author name)
  • Get citation totals for specific journals (by year)
  • Get highly cited articles on particular subjects
  • Get highly cited articles by year
  • Get lists of the top 10 journals for total citations by year

Have additional questions about using MathSciNet? Check out the MathSciNet FAQ or ask a CU librarian any questions you may have.

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Journal Citation Reports (JCR)

Using the citation data available from the Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports allows you to view reports of journal citation activity in the Sciences and Social Sciences from 1997-2009, including citation activity for individual journals.

 

Eigenfactor (University of Washington)

Using algorithms developed to assess the influence of scholarly journals, the Eigenfactor website allows you to search for individual journals, by year, to determine the importance of a journal in a given year (based on five years of citation data). The Eigenfactor score is also a part of Journal Citation Reports.

 

 

 

Publish Not Perish

This free software application assesses the impact of the work from an individual academic using citation analysis (using data from Google Scholar).