UCB Libraries

 

How do I... measure the impact of research and scholarship?

 

  • Introduction
  • Journal Impact
  • Article Impact
  • Book/Data Impact
  • Individual

Use the tabs to find information about how to measure the impact of your scholarly research.

 

  • Quantitatively evaluate your academic productivity and the impact of your work on the discipline.
  • Find out which the top tier journals are in the field
  • Demonstrate the impact of your research to funders and employers
  • Find top researchers within a given field

 

Caveat: There is no one over-arching tool that measures impact. Each database or tools uses its own measurement systems, indices, data and authority files.

 

Please feel free to contact a librarian if you have any questions or if you wish to set up an appointment for research help.

 

Also see the Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources from the University of Oxford.

 

 

Journal Citation Reports (JCR)

Using the citation data available from the Web of Science, Journal Citation Reports allows you to view reports of journal citation activity in the Sciences and Social Sciences from 1997-2009, including citation activity for individual journals.

Eigenfactor (University of Washington)

Using algorithms developed to assess the influence of scholarly journals, the Eigenfactor website allows you to search for individual journals, by year, to determine the importance of a journal in a given year (based on five years of citation data). The Eigenfactor score is also a part of Journal Citation Reports.

SCImago (CSIC, Spain)

SCImago Journal & Country Rank provides journal rankings based on three-year's worth of citation data from SCOPUS, a major Elsevier scientific abstracting and indexing database. Unlike JCR, SCImago is a free database, open and accessible to all regardless of institutional affiliation. Its journal rankings are based on the SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) indicator, a refinement of Google's PageRank algorithm.

MLA Directory of Periodicals

Searches periodicals indexed by the Modern Language Association (Language, Literature, Linguistics, Film). Also gives data on number of articles accepted/year and other information.

Ulrichsweb

Comprehensive information about hundreds of thousands of journals, including both active and ceased titles. Search for a journal by keyword(s) or ISSN. Limit your results to place of publication, journal topic, refereed designation, etc.

 

  • Number of subscriptions (indicator of quantity)
  • Refereed designation (indicator of quality)
  • Subject classification and description of content and topics covered
  • Abstracting and indexing sources (indicator of quality and accessibility, i.e. the more services there are indexing a journal, the more it is seen and used by researchers; see also the note about CUFTS, below)
  • Indication of inclusion in ISI's Journal Citation Reports (JCR) database (indicator of quality, though the vast majority of literary and foreign language journals are not included in JCR, see above)
  • Reviews of the journal (indicator of uniqueness and relevance, but keep in mind that library-oriented reviews are often not welcomed by tenure committees)

The open-source CUFTS provides information about indexing sources and full-text availability for thousands of journal titles.

 

SNIP: Source Normalized Impact per Paper

Measures contextual citation impact by weighting citations based on the total number of citations in a subject field. The impact of a single citation is given higher value in subject areas where citations are less likely, and vice versa.  It is defined as the ratio of a journal’s citation count per paper and the citation potential in its subject field. It aims to allow direct comparison of sources in different subject fields.

SJR: SCImago Journal Rank Indicator

The SCImago Journal & Country Rank is a portal that includes the journals and country scientific indicators developed from the information contained in the Scopus database. These indicators can be used to assess and analyze scientific domains.

ScienceCard

Collects all scientific works published by an author and displays aggregate work-level metrics. ScienceCard also allows a researcher to create and maintain a researcher profile with minimal effort, and to export and reuse this information elsewhere.

Publish Not Perish

This free software application assesses the impact of the work from an individual academic using citation analysis (using data from Google Scholar).

 

Based on a guide by David Murray, Temple University

 

Web of Science

Coverage: The Web of Science contains citations from high impact journals within the broad fields of Science (1900-present), Social Sciences (1900-present) and Arts and Humanities (1975-present).

 

What you can do: You can conduct a "Cited Reference Search" to search for both the number and citation details of the works that cited the original work. To complete a cited reference search, you need to:

 

  • Enter the author's name
    • Tip: Search both last name, initial and last name, first name - like Wieman, C* OR Wieman, Carl
  • Enter the name of the journal/publication (not the article title)
    • Tip: Use the journal abbreviation look up to use to search the title - like Brit Med J OR BMJ (for British Medical Journal)
  • Enter the year of publication (ex: 2001)
  • You'll then see a list of articles that matched your search. Select the article you're interested in by placing a checkmark in the box to the left of the chosen article, then click the "Finish Search" button. You'll then see a list of all of the citing articles, and you'll have the ability to refine/narrow the list with the options presented on the left side of the screen.

 

  • Check the Author Details for the h-index (Dr. J. E. Hirsch)
    The h-index is "an index to quantify an individual’s scientific research output" and can be used to measure the impact of an individual’s work, compare people within a discipline or find top researchers within a given field. More information

 

  • You can also try ResearcherID, which is a website where invited researchers can register for a unique researcher ID number. At this site, users can update their profile information, build their publication list using Web of Science and Web of Knowledge search services or uploading a file, and select to make their profile public or private. Registered as well as non-registered users can search the ResearcherID Registry to view profiles and find potential collaborators.

Google Scholar

Coverage: Google Scholar includes information about "articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites." More information available from About Google Scholar.

 

What you can do: Many search results in Google Scholar will display a "Cited by #" link underneath each result

 

  • Search for the specific work or author you're looking for
  • Clicking on the "Cited by #" link displayed underneath many items listed in the search results will bring you to the list of works that cited the original work.
  • Additionally, you can used the Advanced Scholar Search to search for specific works by authors, publications, and date ranges. Advanced Scholar Search will also allow you to limit your results by subject area, rather than everything Google Scholar contains.
  • Google Scholar Citations also provides a simple way for authors to keep track of citations to their articles. You can check who is citing your publications, graph citations over time, and compute several citation metrics. You can also make your profile public, so that it may appear in Google Scholar results when people search for your name.

Ebsco (Academic Search Premier)

Coverage: Many (but not all) of the EBSCO research databases have linked cited references available in the search results. (Examples: Academic Search Premier, Business Source Complete, plus others.)

 

What you can do: Some search results in some of the EBSCO research databases will display a "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link underneath individual search results

  • Search by author, title, publication title, publication year, etc.
  • Find the work you were searching for in search results
  • Look for the "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link
  • Clicking on the "Times Cited in this Database (#)" link will bring you to the list of other works that cited the original work

Proquest (MLA, LLBA etc)

Coverage: Many (but not all) of the Proquest research databases have cited reference linking available in the search results. (Examples: MLA, LLBA, others - see the full list from Proquest)

 

What you can do: Some search results in some of the Proquest research databases will display a "Cited by (#)" link underneath individual citations in the search results

  • Search by author, title, publication title, publication year, etc.
  • Find the work you were searching for in search results
  • Look for the "Cited by (#)" link
  • Clicking on the "Cited by (#)" link will bring you to the list of other works that cited the original work

PLOS Article-Level Metrics

Coverage: Journal articles indexed in the Public Library of Science (PLOS)

 

What you can do: Find elevant performance data on articles including online usage, citations, social bookmarks, notes, comments, ratings and blog coverage. The data can be found under the ‘Metrics’ tab of each PLoS article.

Mendeley

Set up a profile on Mendeley to track citations to your articles.

Impact Story

Offers a quick and easy view of the impact of research output. It goes beyond traditional measurements of research output to embrace a much broader evidence of use across a wide range of scholarly output types. The system aggregates impact data from many sources and displays it in a single report, which is given a perma-URL for sharing and can be updated at any time.

ORCID

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities.

CitedIn

Locates exactly where authors have been cited on the Web. Some papers may have been mentioned in unexpected places like blogs, databases and Wikipedia and Citedin finds them all.

Altmetric.com

Tracks tens of thousands of article mentions a month across Twitter, the scientific blogosphere and publishers including The Guardian, the NYT and New Scientist.

ScienceCard

Collects all scientific works published by an author and displays aggregate work-level metrics. ScienceCard also allows a researcher to create and maintain a researcher profile with minimal effort, and to export and reuse this information elsewhere.

Publish Not Perish

This free software application assesses the impact of the work from an individual academic using citation analysis (using data from Google Scholar).

Partially based on a guide by David Murray, Temple University

Book Impact

World Cat

Use Worldcat to compile a list of libraries that own the book in question, an indicator of quantity.WorldCat gives the truest indication of the total number of owning libraries. Search by author, title, or ISBN (unique book number). Look for "Libraries Worldwide" in the bibliographic record.

Google Scholar

No comprehensive analysis of an author's corpus can afford to overlook Google Scholar. Look for "Cited by X" in the Google Scholar results list. Note that Google Scholar is the best tool for analyzing the impact of a book as opposed to a journal article.

 

Google introduced Google Scholar Citations in 2011. Google Scholar Citations tracks citations to scholarly publications. It is easy to create a profile.

MLA International BibliographyJSTOR, and ProjectMUSE 

All are extremely useful for finding scholarly book reviews, as can the interdisciplinary database Academic Search Premier. These databases cover, in addition to book reviews, scholarly journal articles, dissertations, editorials, and speeches, so you will likely wish to limit your results to book reviews. Unfortunately, no designated book review field exists in MLA, but the phrase "review article" is often used in a record's subject field for this purpose. It is easy to limit your search to "Reviews" in JSTOR.

Book Review Digest

Includes records for about 1.3 million book reviews and 550,000 books. More than 100,000 reviews are available full text. Covers 1983 to the present. Reviews are drawn from both scholarly and general-interest periodicals.

ScienceCard

Collects all scientific works published by an author and displays aggregate work-level metrics. ScienceCard also allows a researcher to create and maintain a researcher profile with minimal effort, and to export and reuse this information elsewhere.

 

Data Impact

Few researchers are currently consistently citing data, which means that it is difficult to track and measure impact based on citation. However data citation is an important and emerging trend in terms of new impact metrics and the following tools should help.

 

For more information see:

 

 

Specific Tools and Projects

 

ACADIS (Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service)

Data archival, preservation and access for all projects funded by NSF's Arctic Science Program (ARC).

ScienceWISE with ArXiv

Can be used to link data to research articles

Data Cite

DataCite helps researchers to find, access, and reuse data

Earth Cube

Geosciences integrated data management infrastructures

 

Resources for persistent identifiers

 

EZID

Create & manage unique, long-term identifiers

ARK

URLs designed to support long-term access to information objects

DOI

Technical and social infrastructure for the registration and use of persistent interoperable identifiers for use on digital networks

 

H-index

Web of Knowledge

  1. Go to Web of Knowledge and click on the big green button
  2. Click the Web of Science tab at the top of the screen
  3. Rnter the author’s name in the format surname initial* (e.g. raven e*)
  4. Change the search option from the drop down menu to Author
  5. Click Search
  6. At the top right of the results is the option to Create Citation Report. Click this.
  7. The analysis appears, along with the person’s relative h-index.

Google Scholar Citations

Simple way for authors to keep track of citations to their articles. You can check who is citing your publications, graph citations over time, and compute several citation metrics. You can also make your profile public, so that it may appear in Google Scholar results when people search for your name.

Altmetrics

Mendeley

Set up a profile on Mendeley to track citations to your articles.

Impact Story

Offers a quick and easy view of the impact of research output. It goes beyond traditional measurements of research output to embrace a much broader evidence of use across a wide range of scholarly output types. The system aggregates impact data from many sources and displays it in a single report, which is given a perma-URL for sharing and can be updated at any time.

ORCID

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes you from every other researcher and supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities.

CitedIn

Locates exactly where authors have been cited on the Web. Some papers may have been mentioned in unexpected places like blogs, databases and Wikipedia and Citedin finds them all.

Altmetric.com

Tracks tens of thousands of article mentions a month across Twitter, the scientific blogosphere and publishers including The Guardian, the NYT and New Scientist.

ScienceCard

Collects all scientific works published by an author and displays aggregate work-level metrics. ScienceCard also allows a researcher to create and maintain a researcher profile with minimal effort, and to export and reuse this information elsewhere.

Publish Not Perish

This free software application assesses the impact of the work from an individual academic using citation analysis (using data from Google Scholar).