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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 54

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Author

Moody, Elizabeth (nee Greenly, d.1814).

Title

Poetic trifles. By Elizabeth Moody.

Imprint

London : printed by H. Baldwin and Son; for T. Cadell, Jun. and W. Davies, 1798.

Physical description

[4],xv,[1],186p.; 8. Without half-title. Contemporary quarter calf, marbled boards, neatly rebacked.

Call number

WPRP 54.

Citation

C, IPSr (-ht); NjP, CtY, CLU in ESTC. Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women, p. 225; Lonsdale, Eighteenth-Century Women Poets, p. 401-7.

Notes

Elizabeth Moody died 1814. Poetic Trifles is her first collection and contains poems addressed to Erasmus Darwin, Mrs. Trimmer, Joseph Priestly, and John Opie the painter, also a poem, written in 1786, entitled "Dr. Johnson's Ghost (on Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides). She married Christopher Lake Moody, a clergyman who lived at Surbiton Farm, where he was a neighbour of Ralph Griffiths, editor of the Monthly Review. Between 1789 and 1808 Elizabeth Moody contributed to the Monthly Review, usually dealing with fiction, which, as she stated in 1790, she believed had been dominated by women in the later decades of the century. She seems to have been the first reviewer used on anything approaching a regular basis by Ralph Griffiths.

Notes

Includes Preface.

Epigraph

none

Contents

 

Thoughts on War and Peace

1

To Dr. Darwin, on reading his "Loves of the Plants"

8

A Dialogue between Beauty and Time

13

To a Gentleman who invited me to go Fishing

19

An Address by a Gentleman to his dead Dog, which was stuffed, and placed in a corner of his Library

20

A New Song, of a gallant young Soldier, who turned himself into a Priest, to the old tune of Derry Down

22

The Distemper’d Muse

26

Answer to some Verses written by a Gentleman to a Lady, in which he too favorably palliates the Inconstancy of her Disposition

30

To Dr. Priestly; on his Publication entitled "A Disquisition relating to Matter and Spirit"

32

The Housewife’s Prayer on the morning preceding a FÍte

33

Verses written in the Autumn

35

On the Death of Miss Maria Bradshaw

38

Epitaph on the Italian Satyrist, Peter Aretine

40

Verses addressed to a Lady on a new Carriage take fire

41

To a Lady, on a difference that arose between her and the Author on the subject of the Devil

43

To the Same, on her replying to the foregoing lines in three smart satirical Epigrams

44

To Fashion

47

Verses supposed to be written by an Epicure at Margate, on seeing a Dutch vessel sail by laden with Turbot for the London market

49

A Prophecy by Miss R.P.

51

Sappho, tempted by the Prophecy, burns her books and cultivates the Culinary Arts

52

On hearing that Bob Wigs were coming into Fashion, in consequence of the Prince of Wales wearing one when he went a hunting

55

To Clarinda, with the present of a Purse

57

The Address of a Toad to Mr. Opie the Painter while sitting for his picture

58

Dr. Johnson’s Ghost; written in the year 1786

59

From a Sick and Dying Plant at Hampton-Court, to her vigorous healthy Sister at Surbiton-Farm

63

To a Lady who sent the Author a present of a fashionable Bonnet

69

To a Friend, on her having suffered a dangerous illness in the Winter, and recovered from it in the Spring

72

On the Death of an Infant

74

On seeing the funeral of a poor old Woman, who had been a faithful Servant many years in the Author’s Family

75

To the New Year 1796, who made his first appearance when the weather was uncommonly fine

76

Anna’s Complaint, or the miseries of War, written in the Isle of Thanet, 1794

80

On reading a paltry scurrilous epigram, intended to asperse a great Law character. To Mr. Er---k---ne

84

Stanzas

85

The Primrose, a Fable

87

To Mr. -------- on his leaving England

94

To a Lady, on her approaching Nuptials

95

On a very dear Friend, drinking the Cheltenham waters for the recovery of his Health. To Hygeia

97

From a Gentleman to a little Girl, whose profile he had taken on a paper, and afterwards had desired to have a pillow dressed in her usual apparel that he might represent the figure also

98

The Old Maid to Stella

101

To a Friend, who resided on the banks of the Thames

104

From a Lover to his Mistress, who had desired him to burn her Letter

106

Translation

108

Speeches in the French Convention, on the decree for taking up Mirabeaus’ bones

110

On Youth

115

To a beautiful little Girl of four years old, sitting in her baby-house surrounded by her play-things

117

Addressed to a Picture of Prudence

119

To a little Girl, on her burying a favorite Bird

120

The Rose to Dr. Priestly

123

Verses written on the unfortunate Queen of France just before her execution in 1793

126

Funereal Thoughts, on the death of my brother, Edward Greenly, Esq. of Clifton

130

On the death of my much valued Friend, Edward Lovibond, Esq.

132

On the death of Horace Walpole, Earl of Orford

133

A Hymn of Gratitude

134

To my niece, Mrs. Greenly, of Clifton, who had made me a present of a candle-skreen

136

On leaving Brentely-Hall in Suffolk, the seat of Edward Goate, Esq. Addressed to my Friends of that mansion

139

EPIGRAM.--From the Pope to the King of Naples, on his having refused him an asylum

141

Ditto.--On the Resurrection of Men

ibid.

Ditto.--To a Lady who was a great Talker

142

Ditto.--On reading that thirty Prayer-books had been stolen out of a Church

ibid.

EPIGRAM.--To a Friend who had given the Author a Reading Glass

143

Ditto.--On hearing a very disagreeable Preacher

ib.

On Mr. Wilkes losing his Election at Brentford. A Parody

144

The Temptation, or Satan in the Country

145

The Picture of the Good Sort of Man respected by all his Country Neighbors

156

Nature and Physick--Addressed to Doctor Huet

159

PARODY.--On the death of a celebrated Physician, written in the Character of a Brother of the Faculty

161

On hearing that Buonaparte was Landed in Egypt

162

To Mrs. Trimmer, on her publication entitled "The Servant’s Friend"

164

The Housewife, or the Muse learning to ride the great Horse Heroic

166

To Sleep--A Song

173

Verses written in a Pocket-book, which formerly belonged to a Gentleman who was a Divine and a Philosopher

175

The Grateful Tribute of the Poor Dog, usually employed in the experiment of the Grotta del Cane--to Mr. C------n

177

Myra petitions Love to inform her where Indifference resides

181

Love’s Reply

182

On the word Last

185