UCB Libraries

 

Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 80

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

 

Author

Tuite, Elizabeth, Lady (1764-1850).

Title

Poems. By Lady Tuite.

Imprint

London : printed for T. Cadell, Jun, and W. Davies (successors to Mr.Cadell), 1796.

Physical description

[8],199,[1]p.; 8. With a half-title. Contemporary full green straight-grain morocco, spine and boards gilt.

Call number

WPRP 80

Citation

L, Dt, E, O; CtY, CLU. (Unverified) - IU in ESTC. Listing only the second edition of 1796; Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women, p. 352; Janet Todd, Dictionary of British and AmericanWomen Writers, 1660-1800, "Both poems and songs tend to be patriotic in theme with some of the longer poems providing vivid descriptions of social corruption and advocating reform." p. 309. Lady Elizabeth Dorothea Tuite, niece of the Countess of Moria.

Notes

Includes Dedication.

Epigraph

none

Contents

No Contents page. Includes:

Answer to Mrs. Greville’s "Ode to Indiffereence."

1

Written at the Close of the Year 1794

7

--------------

13

Imitation of a Poem of Sir Philip Sidney’s "Astrophel and Stella sweet."

21

On Being Desired by a Very Loquacious Lady to Make Verses on Her

26

Lines on a Rose

29

Written as a Sylph to a Young Lady

32

Second Poem, Written as a Sylph to a Very Young Lady

46

On Giving Advice

58

Damon and Laura. A Fragment

61

Occasioned by the Story of a Beggar

70

The Excuse, on Being Desired to Write Verses by One Lady, After Having Been Advised Against it by Another

78

On Burning Some Letters

81

Elegy

84

Written As a Sylph to a Young Lady. Part I.

91

Written As a Sylph to a Young Lady. Part II.

95

To a Friend, Written, 1782

102

Written as a Sylph to a Friend

104

Written on the Birth-Day of my Best Friend

108

On Reading these Last Lines of my Answer to Mrs. Greenville, "Regret may oft extort a sigh,/ Or disappointment cloud the sky,/ And blast my promis’d joys;/ But hope again shall warm my breast,/ And others bliss can make me blest,/ Tho’ care my own destroys."

111

To the Memory of my Best Friend

116

Lines Written for a Fausse Montre.

118

On Being Accused of Caprice, by a Person with whom I had Lived in Friendship

120

Inscription for an Hermitage

122

Imitation of Littleton’s Character of his Wife

124

Extempore on a Very Little Woman Reading Goldsmith

127

To a Friend Who Complained of the Caprice of Fortune. Extempore

129

---------------

130

For an Urn, to the Memory of the Late Countess of L--------

131

Written on Being Disturbed by the Singing of Birds

132

Extempore. Written under a Friend’s Picture

133

To Memory

134

Intended for Mrs. H. More’s Cheap Publications

136

To a Friend, Fearful of Being Forgotten in Absence.

138

Song. Hosier’s Ghost

140

On Being Teazed to go More into Company

142

Song. To the Tune of "The Topsails."

144

Song. Tune "How imperfect is expression."

147

Song. To an Old Irish Tune

149

Song. Tune "My Nancy leaves the rural plain."

151

Song. On Hearing a Comparison Drawn Between a Lady and the Sun, on Account of her Universal Attraction.

154

Song.

156

Song

158

Song. In the Year 1794.

160

Song

163

Song. To the Tune of "The Dying Indian."

165

Song.

167

Song. The Tulip and the Rose

169

Charade

171

Song.

173

Song.

175

Song. Tune "The Wat’ry God."

177

A Vision. To a Friend

180

Charade to a Friend

188

Epistle to the Countess Dowager of E-------- London, 1795

190

-------------

193

Written Under an Address to Fortune

196

Fragment

.198