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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 86

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Author

More, Hannah (1745-1833).

Title

The Works of Hannah More.

Imprint

London : H. Fisher, R. Fisher & P. Jackson, 1835.

Physical description

6v.

Citation

Title in Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women, as "The Works of Hannah More" pp 229-230; also at Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto.

Call number

WPRP 86.

Notes

Contains "Imprints’ Address."
 
Illustrations with captions from the author:

Epigraph

none

Contents

 

Vol. I:

Parley was a little frightened for he thought he perceived one or two persons behind Flatterwell.

Vol.II: no caption

Vol.III: no caption

Vol.IV: no caption

Vol. V: Farewell! thou pride of this immortal coast!

Tis Rome alone a Regulus can boast.

Vol. VI: But soft! &endash; what unknown prodigy appears?

A moving mountain cased in polished brass!

CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

Stories for Persons of Middle Ranks.

Memoir of Mrs. Hannah More

9 to 72

Author’s Preface to her Works

i to xiv

The History of Mr. Fantom and his Man William

1

The Two Wealthy Farmers

33

" ’Tis All For The Best"

147

A Cure for Melancholy

166

The Sunday School

183

The Pilgrims

197

The Valley of Tears

212

The Strait Gate and the Broad Way

220

Parley the Porter

233

Tales for the Common People.

The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

251

 

 

CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

Tales for the Common People.

The Two Shoemakers&emdash;

Part I.

5

Part II.

21

Part III.

35

Part IV.

91 [i.e. 51]

Part V.

66

Part VI.

76

Tom White the Postboy--

Part I.

85

Part II.

51 [i.e. 98]

Hester Wilmot; being the Second Part of the Sunday School

119

Part V.

131

Allegories:

The Grand Assizes, or General Gaol Delivery

145

The Servant Man Turned Soldier

155

Betty Brown, the St. Giles’s Orange Girl

167

Black Giles the Poacher&emdash;

Part I.

181

Part II.

193

Tawney Rachel, or the Fortune Teller

208

Village Politics

221

Thoughts on the Importance of the Manners of the Great to General Society

237

Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World

287

Remarks on the Speech of M. Dupont, with a prefatory Address on

behalf of the French Emigrant Clergy

377

CONTENTS OF VOLUME III.

Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education.

Introduction

v

Chapter. I. Address to women of rank and fortune, on the effects of their influence on society.-- Suggestions for the exertion of its various instances

11

Chapter II. On the education of women.--The prevailing system tends to establish the errors which it ought to correct.-- Dangers arising from the excessive cultivation of the arts

46

Chapter. III. External improvement.-- Children’s Balls.-- French Governesses

60

Chapter. IV. Comparison of the mode of female education in the last age with the present

68

Chapter. V. On the religious employment of time.-- On the manner in which holidays are passed.-- Selfishness and inconsideration considered.-- Dangers arising from the world

76

Chapter. VI. ON THE EARLY FORMING OF HABITS. On the necessity of forming the judgments to direct those habits

91

Chapter. VII. Filial obedience not the character of the age.-- A comparison with the preceding age in this respect.-- Those who cultivate the mind advised to study the nature of the soil.-- Unpromising children often make strong characters.-- Teachers too apt to devote their pains almost exclusively to children of parts

100

Chapter. VIII. On female study, and initiation into knowledge.-- Error of cultivating the imagination to the neglect of judgment.-- Books of reasoning recommended

114

Chapter. IX. On the religious and moral use of history and geography

127

Chapter. X. On the use of definitions, and the moral benefits of accuracy in language

140

Chapter. XI. On religion.-- The necessity and duty of early instruction shewn by analogy with human learning

147

Chapter. XII. On the manner of instructing young persons in religion.-- General remarks on the genius of Christianity

159

Chapter. XIII. Hints suggested by furnishing young persons with a scheme of prayer

178

Chapter. XIV. The practical use of female knowledge, with a sketch of the female character, and a comparative view of the sexes

187

Chapter. XV. Conversation.--Hints suggested on the subject.-- On the tempers and dispositions to be introduced in it.-- Errors to be avoided.-- Vanity under various shapes the cause of those errors

210

Chapter. XVI. On the danger of an ill-directed sensibility

242

Chapter. XVII. On dissipation, and the modern habits of fashionable life

253

Chapter. XVIII. On public amusements

289

Chapter. XIX. A worldly spirit incompatible with the spirit of Christianity

305

Chapter. XX. On the leading doctrines of Christianity.-- The corruption of human nature.-- The doctrine of redemption. The necessity of a change of heart, and of the divine influences to produce that change.-- With a sketch of the Christian character.

326

Chapter. XXI. On the duty and efficacy of prayer

352

 

 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV.

Hints Towards Forming the Character of a Young Princess.

Includes Dedication and Preface.

CHAP. I.--Introductory Chapter

9

CHAP. II.--On the acquisition of knowledge

14

CHAP. III.--On the importance of forming the mind

22

CHAP. IV.--The education of a Sovereign a specific education

31

CHAP. V.--Importance of studying ancient history

43

CHAP. VI.--Laws: --Egypt--Persia

49

CHAP. VII.--Greece

55

CHAP. VIII.--Rome

66

CHAP. IX.--Characters of historians who were themselves concerned in the transactions which they record

79

CHAP. X.--Reflections on history--Ancient historians

83

CHAP. XI.--English history--Mr. Hume

93

CHAP. XII.--Important areas of English history:--Alfred --King John--Henry VII.

98

CHAP. XIII.--Queen Elizabeth

106

CHAP. XIV.--Moral advantages to be drawn from the study of history, independent of the examples it exhibits.--It proves the corruption of human nature; it demonstrates the superintending power of Providence--illustrated by instances

115

CHAP. XV.--On the distinguishing characteristics of Christianity

126

CHAP. XVI.--On the Scripture evidences of Christianity.-- The Christian religion peculiarly adapted to the exigencies of man; and especially calculated to supply the defects of heathen philosophy

135

CHAP. XVII.--The use of history in teaching the choice of favourites.--Flattery.--Our taste improved in the arts of adulation.--The dangers of flattery exemplified

152

CHAP. XVIII.--Religion necessary to the well-being of states

165

CHAP. XIX.-- Integrity the true political wisdom

181

CHAP. XX.-- On the true arts of popularity

191

CHAP. XXI.--The importance of the royal example in promoting loyalty.--On false patriotism.--Public spirit

200

CHAP. XXII.--On the graces of deportment.--The dispositions necessary for business.--Habits of domestic life

204

CHAP. XXIII.--On the choice of society.-- Sincerity the bond of familiar intercourse.-- Liberality.-- Instances of ingratitude in princes.-- On raising the tone of conversation.-- And of manners

210

CHAP. XXIV.--On the art of moral calculation, and forming a just estimate of things and persons

221

CHAP. XXV.--On erroneous judgment.-- Character of queen Christina of Sweden.--Comparison of Christina with Alfred

230

CHAP. XXVI.--Observation on the age of Louis XIV and on Voltaire

236

CHAP. XXVII.--An examination of the claims of those princes who aspire to the appellation of Great

248

CHAP. XXVIII.--Books

263

CHAP. XXIX.--Of periodical essay writers, particularly Addisson and Johnson

271

CHAP. XXX.--Books of Amusement

281

CHAP. XXXI.--Books of Instruction

293

CHAP. XXXII.--The Holy Scriptures--The Old Testament

301

CHAP. XXXIII.--The Holy Scriptures--The New Testament

309

CHAP. XXXIV.--On the abuse of terms--Enthusiasm--Superstition.&emdash;Zeal for religious opinions no proof of religion

319

CHAP. XXXV.--The Reformation

332

CHAP. XXXVI.--On the importance of religious and observances.--They are suited to the nature of Christianity, and practically adapted to the character of man

340

CHAP. XXXVII.--On the established church of England

348

CHAP. XXXVIII.--Superintendence of Providence manifested in the local circumstances, and in the religious history of England

362

CHAP. XXXIX.--The same subject continued.--Tolerant spirit of the church.--Circumstances which led to the Revolution, and to the providential succession of the House of Hanover

376

CHAP. XL.--On Christianity as a principle of action, especially as it Respects supreme rulers

339

 

 

CONTENTS OF VOL. VI.

Turn the Carpet, or the Two Weavers

5

EPITAPHS AND INSCRIPTIONS.

On the Rev. Mr. Penrose

9

On Mrs. Blandford

9

On Mrs. Little

10

On General Lawrence

10

On the Rev. Mr. Hunter

11

To the Memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Ives

11

On C. Dicey, Esq.

12

On a Young Lady

12

Inscription on a Cenotaph

13

Epitaph on the Rev. Mr. Love

13

On Sir James Stonhouse, Bart., M.D.

15

On Sarah Stonhouse

16

On Mr. Shapland

17.

HYMNS.

The True Heroes, or the Noble Army of Martyrs

19

A Christmas Hymn

22

Morning Soliloquy

25

Hymn of Praise for the abundant Harvest

27

Inscription in Fairy Bower

31

The Foolish Traveler

34

The Impossibility conquered

38

The Bad Bargain

41

Here and There

44

BALLADS.

The Honest Miller of Gloucestershire

46

King Dionysius and Squire Damocles

49

The Hackney Coachman

52

Robert and Richard: or, the Ghost of Poor Molly

54

The Carpenter, or the Danger of Evil Company

57

The Riot, or Half a Loaf is better than no Bread

62

Patient Joe

66

The Gin-Shop, or a Peep into a Prison

69

SACRED DRAMAS.

Advertisement

79

Introduction

83

Moses in the Bulrushes

89

David and Goliath

107

Belshazzar

149

Daniel

183

Reflections of King Hezekiah in his Sickness

215

Search after Happiness, a Pastoral Drama

223

Ode to Charity

255

ESSAYS.

Introduction

261

On Dissipation

267

Thoughts on Conversation

277

On Envy

289

On Sentimental or Romantic Connexions

295

On True and False Meekness

309

On the Education of Daughters

317

Importance of Religion to the Female Character

333

On Genius, Taste, Good Sense, &c.

343

MORIANA

359