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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 141

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Author

[More, Hannah (1745-1833).]

Title

The Works of Hannah More, in eight volumes: including several pieces never before published.

Title

Village politics, addressed to all the mechanics, journeymen, and day labourers in Great Britain, by Will Chip [pseud.] a country carpenter.

Imprint

London : for T. Cadell Jun. and W. Davies, in the Strand, 1801.

Physical description

8 vol.

Citation

Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women, p. 229.

Call number

WPRP 141.

Notes

Includes Preface.

Epigraph

none

Online copies

Hathi Trust (Volumes V, VI, VIII lacking)

Volume I

Volume II

Volume III

Volume IV

Volume VII

Contents

 

CONTENTS OF THE FIRST VOLUME.

THE Puppet Show

1

The Bas Bleu

13

Bonner’s Ghost

37

Florio

47

The Slave Trade

97

Dan and Jane: or, Faith and Works

117

An Heroic Epistle to Miss Sally Horne

123

Sensibility: An Epistle to the Honourable Mrs. Boseawen

135

Sir Eldred the Bower: A Legendary Tale

159

The Bleeding Rock

191

Ode to Drago

203

EPITAPHS.

On the Rev. Mr. Penrose

211

On Mrs. Blandford

212

On Mrs. Little

212

On General Lawrence

213

On the Rev. Mr. Hunter

214

On Mrs. Elizabeth Ives

215

On C. Dicey, Esq.

216

On a Young Lady

216

Inscription on a Cenotaph

217

Epitaph on the Rev. Mr. Love

218

On the Rev. Sir James Stonhouse, Bart.

219

On Mrs. Stonhouse

219

BALLADS AND TALES.

The Foolish Traveler: or, a good Inn is a bad Home

221

The Impossibility conquered: or, Love your Neighbor as Yourself

227

Inscription in Fairy Bower

231

The Bad Bargain: or, the World set up to Sale

235

Robert and Richard: or, the Ghost of Poor Molly

241

The Carpenter: or, the Danger of Evil Company

247

The Riot: or, Half a Loaf is better than no Bread

255

Patient Joe: or, the Newcastle Collier

261

The Gin-Shop: or, a Peep into a Prison

266

The Two Gardeners

273

The Lady and the Pye

276

The Plum-Cakes

281

Turn the Carpet

287

HYMNS.

The True Heroes: or, the Noble Army of Martyrs

291

A Christmas Hymn

295

Hymn of Praise for the Abundant Harvest, after the Scarcity of 1795

299

Here and There

303

BALLADS.

The Honest Miller of Gloucestershire

306

King Dionysius, and Squire Damocles

311

The Hackney Coachman: or, the Way to get a good Fare

316

Village Politics

323

CONTENTS OF THE SECOND VOLUME.

THE INTRODUCTION

9

MOSES

19

DAVID AND GOLIATH

55

BELSHAZZAR

137

DANIEL

199

HEZEKIAH

259

SEARCH AFTER HAPPINESS

271

CONTENTS TO THE THIRD VOLUME.

PREFACE TO THE TRAGEDIES

1

PERCY

53

THE FATAL FALSEHOOD

189

THE INFLEXIBLE CAPTIVE

339

CONTENTS TO THE FOURTH VOLUME.

STORIES FOR PERSONS OF THE MIDDLE RANKS.

MR. FANTOM; or, the History of the New Fashioned Philosopher, and his Man William

1

The History of Mr. Bragwell; or, the Two Wealthy Farmers

65

’Tis all for the Best

288

A Cure for Melancholy

325

The Sunday School

358

ALLEGORIES.

The Pilgrims

387

The Valley of Tears

415

The Strait Gate and the Broad Way

430

Parley the Porter

454

CONTENTS OF THE FIFTH VOLUME.

No Contents page. Includes:

The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain

1

The Two Shoemakers

69

The History of Tom White the Postboy

219

The History of Hester Wilmot

283

Allegories. The Grand Assizes, &c. or General Gaol Delivery

332

The Servant Man Turned Soldier, or The Fair Weather Christian. An Allegory

350

Betty Brown, The St. Giles’s Orange Girl: With some account of Mrs. Sponge, The Money-Lender

372

Black Giles the Poacher; containing Some Account of a Family who had rather live by their Wits than their Work

397

Tawney Rachel; or, the Fortune Teller: with some account of Dreams, Omens, and Conjurers

448

CONTENTS OF THE SIXTH VOLUME.

Thoughts on the Manners of the Great

1

An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World

89

CHAP. I. Decline of Christianity shown, by a comparative View of the Religion of the Great in preceding Ages

107

CHAP. II. Benevolence allowed to be the reigning Virtue, but not exclusively the Virtue of the present Age.--Benevolence not the Whole or Religion, though one of its most characteristic Features. Whether Benevolence proceed from a religious Principle will be more infallibly known by the General Disposition of Time, Fortune, and the common habits of Life, than from a few occasional Acts of Bounty

119

CHAP. III. The Neglect of Religious Education both a Cause and Consequence of the Decline of Christianity. --No Moral Restraints. Religion only incidentally taught, not as a Principal of Action.--A few of the many Causes which dispose the Young to entertain low Opinions of Religion

135

CHAP. IV. Other Symptoms of the Decline of Christianity. No Family Religion.-- Corrupt or Negligent Example of Superiors.--The self-denying and evangelical Virtues held in Contempt.-- Neglect of encouraging and promoting Religion among Servants

173

CHAP. V. The negligent Conduct of Christians, no real Objection against Christianity.-- The Reason why its Effects are not more manifest to Worldly Men, is, because Believers do not lead Christian Lives. Professors differ but little in their Practice from Unbelievers. Even real Christians are too diffident and timid, afraid of acting up to their Principals. The Absurdity of the Charge commonly brought against Serious People, that they are too strict

198

CHAP. VI. A Stranger, from observing the Fashionable Mode of Life, would not take this to be a Christian Country.-- Lives of professing Christians examined by a Comparison with the Gospel.-- Christianity not made the Rule of Life, even by those who profess to receive it as an Object of Faith.--Temporing Writers contribute to lower the Credit of Christianity--Loose Harangues on Morals not calculated to reform the Heart.

226

CHAP. VII. View of those who acknowledge Christianity as a perfectSystem of Morals, but deny its Divine Authority.-- Morality not the Whole of Religion

251

Remarks on the Speech of Mr. Dupont, made in the National Convention of France in 1793

279

CONTENTS OF THE SEVENTH VOLUME.

STRICTURES ON THE MODERN SYSTEM OF FEMALE EDUCATION. With a View of the Principles and conduct Prevalent among Women of Rank and Fortune.

Introduction

ix

CHAP. I. Address to women of rank and fortune, on the effects of their influence on society.-- Suggestions for the exertion of its various instances

1

CHAP II. On the education of women.--The prevailing system tends to establish the errors which it ought to correct.-- Dangers arising from the excessive cultivation of the arts

67

CHAP. III. External Improvement.-- Children’s Balls.-- French Governesses

94

CHAP. IV. Comparison of the mode of female education in the last age with the present

110

CHAP. V. On the religious employment of time.-- On the manner in which holidays are passed.-- Selfishness and inconsideration considered.-- Dangers arising from the world

126

CHAP. VI. ON THE EARLY FORMING OF HABITS. On the necessity of forming the judgments to direct those habits

154

CHAP. VII. Filial obedience not the character of the age.-- A comparison with the preceding age in this respect.-- Those who cultivate the mind advised to study the nature of the soil.-- Unpromising children often make strong characters.-- Teachers too apt to devote their pains almost exclusively to children of parts

172

CHAP. VIII. On female study, and initiation into knowledge.-- Error of cultivating the imagination to the neglect of judgment.-- Books of reasoning recommended

199

CHAP. IX. On the religious and moral use of history and geography

225

CHAP. X. On the use of definitions, and the moral benefits of accuracy in language

250

CHAP. XI. On religion.-- The necessity and duty of early instruction shewn by analogy with human learning

263

CHAP. XII. On the manner of instructing young persons in religion.-- General remarks on the genius of Christianity

286

CHAP. XIII. Hints suggested by furnishing young persons with a scheme of prayer

322

CONTENTS OF THE EIGHTH VOLUME.

STRICTURES ON THE MODERN SYSTEM OF FEMALE EDUCATION. With a View of the Principles and conduct Prevalent among Women of Rank and Fortune.

CHAP. XIV. The practical use of female knowledge, with a sketch of the female character, and a comparative view of the sexes

1

CHAP. XV. CONVERSATION.--Hints suggested on the subject.-- On the tempers and dispositions to be introduced in it.-- Errors to be avoided.-- Vanity under various shapes the cause of those errors

46

CHAP. XVI. On the Danger of an ill-directed Sensibility

106

CHAP. XVII. On dissipation, and the modern habits of fashionable life

147

CHAP. XVIII. On public amusements

199

CHAP. XIX. A worldly spirit incompatible with the spirit of Christianity

229

CHAP. XX. On the leading doctrines of Christianity.-- The corruption of human nature.-- The doctrine of redemption. The necessity of a change of heart, and of the divine influences to produce that change.-- With a sketch of the Christian character.

272

CHAP. XXI. On the duty and efficacy of prayer

324