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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 237

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Author

More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Title

Hints towards forming the character of a young princess. In Two Volumes.

By Hannah More.

Imprint

London: Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies, in the Strand. 1809.

Call Number

WPRP 237

Physical Description:

2 v. 20 cm

Citation

Not in Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women; multiple copies in Worldcat.

Notes

The fourth edition.

 

Epigraph

I call that a complete and generous Education, which fits a Person to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously, all the Offices both of public and private Life; of Peace

and of War. -Milton.

Online copies

Volume II via Hathi Trust

Contents

Volume I.

 

To the right reverend the Lord Bishop of Exeter

v

Preface

ix

CHAP. I. Introductory Chapter.

1

CHAP. II. On the Acquisition of Knowledge.

10

CHAP. III. On the Importance of forming the Mind.

24

CHAP. IV. The Education of a Sovereign a Specific Education.

41

CHAP. V. Importance of studying Ancient History.

63

CHAP. VI. Laws.—Egypt.—Persia.

73

CHAP. VII. Greece.

85

CHAP. VIII. Rome.

106

CHAP. IX. Characters of Historians, who were themselves concerned in the Transactions which they record.

122

CHAP. X. Reflections on History.—Ancient Historians.

135

CHAP. XI. English History.—Mr. Hume.

153

CHAP. XII. Important Æras of English History.—Alfred.—King John.—Henry VII.

162

CHAP. XIII. Queen Elizabeth.

177

CHAP. XIV. Moral Advantages to be drawn from the Study of History, independent of the Examples it exhibits. – It proves the Corruption of Human Nature.—It demonstrates the super-intending Power of Providence—illustrated by Instances.

191

CHAP. XV On the distinguishing Characters of Christianity.

212

CHAP. XVI. On the Scripture Evidences of Christianity.—The Christian religion peculiarly adapted to the Exigencies of Man; and especially calculated to supply the Defects of Heathen Philosophy.

228

CHAP. XVII. The Use of History in teaching the Choice of Favourites.—Flattery.—Our taste improved in the Arts of Adulation.—The Dangers of Flattery exemplified.

261

CHAP. XVIII. Religious necessary to the Well-being of the States.

284

CHAP. XIX. Integrity to true Political Wisdom.

313

 

Volume II.

 

CHAP. XX. On the true Arts of Popularity.

1

CHAP. XXI. The Importance of the Royal Example in promoting Loyalty.—On the false Patriotism.—Public Spirit.

18

CHAP. XXII. On the Graces of Deportment.—The Dispositions necessary for Business.—Habits of domestic Life.

24

CHAP. XXIII. On the Choice of Society.—Sincerity the Bond of familiar Intercourse.—Liberality.—Instances of Ingratitude in Princes.—On raising the Tone of Conversation.—And of Manners.

36

CHAP. XXIV. On the Art of moral Calculation, and forming a just Estimate of Things and Persons.

56

CHAP. XXV. On erroneous Judgment.—Character of Queen Christina of Sweden. – Comparison of Christina with Alfred.

74

CHAP. XXVI. Observations on the Age of Louis XIV. and on Voltaire.

85

CHAP. XXVII. An Examination of the Claims of those Princes who aspired to the Appellation of the GREAT.

106

CHAP. XXVIII. Books.

134

CHAP. XXIX. Of periodical Essay Writers, particularly Addison and Johnson.

149

CHAP. XXX. Books of Amusement.

169

CHAP. XXXI. Books of Instruction.

191

CHAP. XXXII. The Holy Scriptures.—The Old Testament.

206

CHAP. XXXIII. The Holy Scriptures.—The New Testament.

221

CHAP. XXXIV. On the Abuse of Terms.—Enthusiasm.—Superstition.—Zeal for religious Opinions no Proof of Religion.

240

CHAP. XXXV. The Reformation.

265

CHAP. XXXVI. On the Importance of Religious Institutions and Observances.—They are suited to the Nature of Christianity and particularly adapted to the character of Man.

280

CHAP. XXXVII. Of the established Church of England.

295

CHAP. XXXVIII. Superintendence of Providence manifested in the local Circumstances, and in the Religious History of England.

322

CHAP. XXXIX. The same Subject continued.—Tolerant Spirits of the Church.—Circumstances which led to the Revolution, and to the Providential Succession of the House of Hanover.

349

CHAP. XL. On Christianity as a Principle of Action, especially as it respects supreme Rulers.

381