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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 246

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Author

Williams, Helen Maria (1762-1827).

Title

Sketches of the State of Manners and Opinions in the French Republic, towards the close of the eighteenth century.

Imprint

London: Printed [by J. Crowder, Warwick-Square.] for G. G. and J. Robinson, Paternoster-Row, 1801.

Physical description

2 vols. Tall 8vo. Gilt mottled calf. Bookplate and ownership signature of Earl of Granard in each vol.

Citation

Not in Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women; multiple copies in Worldcat.

Call number

WPRP 246

Citation

DNB XXI, 405

Notes

Includes Preface.

Epistolary survey of French and European politics and events by Helen Maria Williams, 1762-1817. She discusses in detail the state of the French Republic, colonial Negro Slavery, the Swiss Revolution and destruction of Helvetic liberty, revolutionary Europe, Lord Nelson in Naples, Bonaparte in Italy, the French Constitution, etc. Of prime importance is the chapter "On the State of Women in the French Republic." Set belonging to George Forbes, 6th Earl of Granard, 1760-1837, general who became a French resident.

Epigraph

none

Online copies

Volume I via Hathi Trust

Volume II via Hathi Trust

Contents

VOL. I.

LETTER I. Points of comparison between Basil and Boestia. Revolution at Basil

1

LETTER II. Remarks on the Resolution of Berne

9

LETTER III. French mode of operating the Swiss Revolution. Fate of the Abbot of Engelberg

15

LETTER IV. Domestic misfortune

28

LETTER V. Observations on the state of the French Republic. Fate of the privileged orders

35

LETTER VI. Continuance of the same subject. Priests. Negro slavery. Peasants.

45

LETTER VII. Strictures of M. Mallet du Pan. History of the destruction of Helvetic liberty.

61

LETTER VIII. Continuance of the same subject

73

LETTER IX. National Institute

87

LETTER X. Revolution of the 30th of Prairial

97

LETTER XI. Jacobins and the Coalition

109

LETTER XII. History of the Revolution and Counter-revolution of Naples. Hostile dispositions of the Court of Naples to the French Republic. English squadron before Naples. Warlike preparations of the Court of Naples.

122

LETTER XIII. The subject continued. Invasions of the Roman Republic by the Neapolitan army. Defeat of the King of Naples. Flight of the Court to Sicily. French in possession of Naples. Neapolitan Republic.

136

LETTER XIV. Subject continued. — Political reflections of a Neapolitan Republican. — Seeds of Counter-revolution. Retreat of the French from Naples. Naples invested by the Counter-revolutionists and coalesced forces.

153

LETTER XV. Subject continued. — Naples in the hands of the insurgents. — Heroic conduct of the garrison of Avigliano. — Cruelties of the Royalists on entering Naples. — Capitulation of the Fort of Castel a Mare to the British forces — Capitulation of the Forts of Castel Nuovo and Castel del' Uovo to the United forces of Russia, the Ottoman Porte, England, and the King of Naples.

167

LETTER XVI. Execution of the capitulation on both sides. — Arrival of Lord Nelson, Sir William and Lady Hamilton, in the bay of Naples. — Infraction of the capitulation. — Review on board the Admiral's ship of the patriots who had capitulated. — Arrival of the King from Sicily, in the bay of Naples. — Royal dispositions towards rebellious subjects. — Installation of St. Anthony, patron of Naples, in place of St. Januarius, found guilty of jacobinism. — Parallel between royal terror at Naples, and jacobine terror in France. — Mistakes of the Neapolitan patriots. — Generous conduct of the British commodore, Admiral Trowbridge.

180

LETTER XVII. Ingenious mode of discovering rebellious subjects. — Banishment of a third part of the persons who had capitulated, and confiscation of their property. — Conditions of this clemency. — Execution of Admiral Carracioli. — Execution at Naples of the remaining two thirds of the persons who had capitulated. — Eleonora Fouseca— Names of a few of the nobles who were objects of royal mercy. — Names of a few of the nobles and other patriots who were put to death. — Domenico Cerilli.

205

LETTER XVIII. French Monuments.

224

LETTER XIX. Suwarrow's escape across the mountains of Glarus. The French army in Palestine. History of Perorou, or the bellows-mender, written by himself.

238

LETTER XX. Country amusements. — Modern Vandalism. — A character.

299

LETTER XXI. Conscientious scruples of a Catholic priest. — Classic cookery.

308

LETTER XXII. Return of Bonaparte

316

CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

LETTER XXIII. Revolution of the 19th of Brumaire

1

LETTER XXIV. Subject continued

23

LETTER XXV. Constitution

33

LETTER XXVI. On the State of Women in the French Republic

44

LETTER XXVII. Observations on the Judicial Organization of the Republic

66

LETTER XXVIII. On the State of Religion in the French Republic

81

LETTER XXIX. Subject continued

99

LETTER XXX. Subject continued

114

LETTER XXXI. Opening of the Campaign in Germany. — Moreau — Reflections on War

123

LETTER XXXII. Departure of Bonaparte from Paris. — Conscripts. — Italian Poets

133

LETTER XXXIII. Bonaparte in Italy

142

LETTER XXXIV. Battle of Maringo.

153

LETTER XXXV. Egyptian Monuments

165

LETTER XXXVI. Bonaparte's Return from Italy

183

LETTER XXXVII. On atheism in the French Republic

191

LETTER XXXVIII. Death of Madame Helvetius

210

LETTER XXXIX. Observations on M. D'Ivernois's Book "On the Causes of the Usurpation, and which are to bring about the Fall of Bonaparte."

226

LETTER XL. The subject continued

255

LETTER XLI. Prospect of Peace

275

LETTER XLII. On National Fêtes. — Observations on the State of Literature in the Republic

285

 

APPENDIX

301

No. I. II. II. IV. V. VI. Justificatory Pieces respecting the Counter-Revolution of Naples

 

No. VII. Analysis of the Constitution

334

No. VIII. Ode on the Deliverance of Italy

349