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Women Poets of the Romantic Period
Individual Item Contents: WPRP 328

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Author

More, Hannah, 1745-1833

Title

Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education : with a view of the principles and conduct prevalent among women of rank and fortune. By Hannah More.

Imprint

Dublin: Printed by William Porter for Pat. Wogan…and William Porter …, 1800.

Call number

WPRP 328

Physical Description

[4], viii, 440 p., [1] leaf of plates : 1 port. ; 18 cm

Citation

Not in Jackson, Romantic Poetry by Women; multiple copies in Worldcat.

Notes

Fifth edition.

Epigraph

May you so raise your character that you may help to make the next age a better thing, and leave posterity in your debt, for the advantage it shall receive by your example. Lord Halifax.

Contents

Introduction.

i

CHAP. I. Address to women of rank and fortune, on the effects of their influence on society.—Suggestion for the exertion of it in various instances.

1

CHAP. II. On the education of women.—The prevailing system tends to establish the errors which it ought to correct.—Dangers arising from an excessive cultivation of the arts.

43

CHAP. III. External improvement.—Children's balls.—French governesses.

60

CHAP. IV. Comparison of the mode of female education in the last age with the present.

71

CHAP. V. On the religious employment of time.—On the manner in which holidays are passed.—Selfishness and inconsideration considered.—Dangers arising from the world.

81

CHAP. VI. Filial obedience not the character of the age.—A comparison with the preceding age in this respect.—Those who cultivate the mind advised to study the nature of the soil.—Unpromising children often make strong characters.—Teachers too apt to devote their pains almost exclusively to children of parts.

99

CHAP. VII. On female study, and initiation into knowledge.—Error of cultivating the imagination to the neglect of judgment.—Books of reasoning recommended.

116

CHAP. VIII. On the religious and moral use of history and geography.

132

CHAP. IX. On the use of definitions, and the moral benefits of accuracy in languages.

149

CHAP. X. On religion.—The necessity and duty of early instruction shown by analogy and human learning.

157

CHAP. XI. On the manner of instructing young persons in Religion.—General remarks on the genius of Christianity.

173

CHAP. XII. Hints suggested for furnishing young persons with a scheme of prayer.

196

CHAP. XIII. The practical use of female knowledge.—Sketch of the female character.—A comparative view of both sexes.

CHAP. XIV. Conversation. Hints suggested on the subject.—On the tempers and dispositions to be introduced in it.—Errors to be avoided.—Vanity under various shapes the cause of those errors.

237

CHAP. XV. On the danger of an ill-directed Sensibility.

277

CHAP. XVI. On dissipation, and the modern habits of fashionable life.

304

CHAP. XVII. On public amusements.

338

CHAP. XVIII. A worldly spirit incompatible with the spirit of Christianity.

358

CHAP. XIX. On the leading doctrines of Christianity.—The corruption of human nature.—The doctrine of redemption.—The necessity of a change of heart, and of the divine influences to produce that change.—A sketch of the Christian character.

385

CHAP. XX. On the duty and efficacy of prayer.

420